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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Science Course Descriptions:

  • Ecology - Develops student understanding of the natural environment and environmental problems the world faces.
  • Physics - Students study the interrelationships between matter and energy.
  • Chemistry I (CP) - Develops student understanding of the relevance of chemistry as it relates to standard of living, career choices, and current issues in science and technology.
  • Anatomy and Physiology - Students study the body’s structures and respective functions.
  • AP Environmental Science - Students will learn scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies to identify environmental problems on a first year college level.
  • AP Biology - A year-long accelerated, in-depth course studying molecular and cellular biology, genetics, evolution and organismal and population biology on a first-year college level.  
  • AP Chemistry - A year long course offering accelerated in-depth coverage in the areas of structure and states of matter, kinetic theory, chemical reactions and the concepts of thermodynamics on a first year college level.  Students must have already passed Chemistry (usually Honors)



Math Course Descriptions:

  • Bridge Math - This course is a 4th year senior level math credit course designed for students who need to refresh core mathematics skills prior to further study.
  • Applied Mathematical Concepts - This course will focus on the big ideas of advanced mathematics. This course is designed to prepare students for both college and the workplace. It is intended for students interested in careers that use applied mathematics such as banking, industry, or human resources.
  • SDC Statistics - An advanced math course that covers the following topics: Appropriate types of samples and sampling methods, appropriate representation of data, measure of center and variation, probability and statistics, discrete probability distribution objectives, normal probability distribution, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, estimates and sample sizes (Confidence Intervals), estimating a population mean:𝜎 known and not known, hypothesis testing objectives, linear regression and correlation. This is an academically challenging course that is aligned to postsecondary standards. Student who meet or exceed the cut score of the culminating challenge exam earn credit that can be applied to any public postsecondary institution in Tennessee. Students are required to sit for the exam.
  • Pre-Calculus CP - This course develops the topics essential for success in Calculus. Content includes a study of algebraic, transcendental, and trigonometric functions, as well as their compositions and inverses, vectors, polar graphing, complex numbers, conic sections, and sequences and series. Students who complete this course successfully will have a strong background for a first-year Calculus sequence. (Prerequisites: Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 with an “A” or “B” average grades recommended)
  • SDC Pre-Calculus - An advanced math course that covers the following topics: Equations, Inequalities, Properties of Functions, Models, Functions, Trigonometric Functions, Triangles, Circles. This is an academically challenging course that is aligned to postsecondary standards. Student who meet or exceed the cut score of the culminating challenge exam earn credit that can be applied to any public postsecondary institution in Tennessee. Students are required to sit for the exam.
  • AP Calculus AB - This course is devoted mainly to the topics in differential and integral calculus. Students who are study this course will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement AB Calculus Exam and seek college credit. (Prerequisites: Honors Pre-Calculus and Departmental Recommendation)
  • AP Calculus BC - This course is an extension of all the topics covered in AP Calculus AB with additional topics. Students who study this course will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement BC Calculus Exam and seek college credit. (Prerequisites: AP Calculus AB and Departmental Recommendation)



English Course Descriptions:

  • English 4 - Students in English 4 work on college and career-ready reading and writing skills while also reading and analyzing foundational works in world literature. They also develop their speaking and listening skills through speeches and presentations.
  • Dual Enrollment English - college level (requires 18 English and 19 Reading on your ACT & 3.0 GPA)
  • English AP Literature and Composition - Students must be highly motivated and have above average writing and analytical skills. The curriculum is an in-depth study of American, British, and World literature with expectations commensurate with the first year of college English. Outside readings are required.



Social Studies Course Descriptions:

  • Personal Finance - This is a one-half credit course. This course is designed to inform students how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing.
  • Economics - This is a one-half credit course. Students will examine the allocation of scarce resources and consider the economic reasoning used by consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. Students will explore the concepts of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, national economic performance, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Finally, students will examine key economic philosophies and economists who have and continue to influence economic decision-making.
  • AP Macro-Economics - The purpose of the AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.



World Language Course Descriptions:

  • LEVEL 1: FRENCH 1; SPANISH 1

For students who are interested in acquiring knowledge of the culture and language. The curriculum includes the study of the culture and basic communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

  • LEVEL 2: FRENCH 2; SPANISH 2

The curriculum includes further study of the skills acquired in Level 1. Students who have successfully completed Level 1 or who have demonstrated proficiency as determined through a language proficiency test or through teacher recommendation are eligible to take this course.

  • LEVEL 3 HONORS: FRENCH 3; SPANISH 3

This course moves at a faster pace and is more in depth. Additional vocabulary and grammar are taught. Increased emphasis is placed on writing, reading, and speaking skills in the target language. (Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation or demonstrated proficiency)

  • LEVEL 4 HONORS: FRENCH 4; SPANISH 4

For students who are motivated to continue the study of language. The curriculum includes the study of literature and further development of communication skills in the language and will help to prepare the student for university-level placement tests in the language. (Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation)

 

 

Fine Arts Course Descriptions:

  • Visual Art - explores and gives experience drawing, painting, printmaking; and sculpture, ceramics, textiles
  • General Music - introduction to music; explore a variety of styles of music
  • Development of Rock and Roll - explore the history and elements of Rock and Roll style music
  • Music History - study a variety of music and create music using computer apps
  • Band (Marching and Concert) - learn and perform instrumental music, and/or colorguard
  • Vocal Music - participation is based on basic choral techniques and performance in the fall/spring concerts

 

 

General Electives Course Descriptions:

  • Visual Literacy - watch historically relevant films and write essay responses to the films
  • Genre Literature - an exploration of stories and books related to a specific type of literature (for example: science fiction, mystery, etc.)
  • African American Literature - students will examine the life and contributions of African Americans through literary analysis of short stories and novels
  • Creative Writing - self-expression through poetry, short stories, and journaling
  • Technical Writing - learn important skills for improving your writing ability
  • Yearbook - sell ads, take pictures around the school and at events, and organize pictures to create yearbook pages
  • Speech - Learn the art of public speaking and practice giving short speeches to the class
  • African American History - students will examine the life and contributions of African Americans from the early 1600’s through modern America.
  • Americans at War - this course is a survey of the conflicts and causes leading up to the War Between the States
  • AP Psychology - explore the concepts, theories, perspectives, phenomena, and behaviors associated with human behavior
  • Public Speaking (Dual Enrollment -Online) - this course prepares students for a variety of professional situations in which formal presentations are expected (2.75 GPA)
  • World Religions (Dual Enrollment - Online) - studies beliefs, practices and underlying spiritual values of the major religions of the world, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism (2.75 GPA)
  • AP Research - learn and apply research methods and practices to address a real-world topic of your choosing, for students who have taken AP Seminar
  • Driver’s Ed - must be 15 years old and pay $150 fee. Must meet state requirements for attendance and academics. The instructional phases consist of classroom, simulation, driving range, and on- street driving instruction.
  • Navy ROTC - develop habits of orderliness, precision, and respect for authority and national security in our society
  • Advanced PE - provide progressive skills, techniques and strategies in various activities
  • Peer Tutoring - give academic and social support to fellow students. There is an application process.
  • NIC Business Management - learn how to create and operate a business



Communications Elective Course Descriptions:

 

Digital Arts and Design Pathway:

  • Digital Arts Design I - The primary aim of this course is to build a strong understanding of the principles and elements of design and the design process. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to utilize industry tools to conceptualize and create communications solutions that effectively reach targeted audiences. Students will acquire basic skills in illustration, typography, and photography.
  • Digital Arts Design II- Students will be able to perform advanced software operations to create photographs and illustrations of increasing complexity. Students will employ design principles and use industry software to create layouts for a variety of applications.
  • Digital Arts Design III (NIC) - Applying design skills developed in prior courses, students will expand their creative and critical thinking skills to create comprehensive multimedia projects and three-dimensional designs. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to use industry-standard software to create multimedia projects, web pages, three-dimensional models, and animations.

Audio/Visual Production Pathway:

  • A/V Production I - Students will be able to explain and complete the phases of the production process including pre-production, production, and post- production. Students will establish basic skills in operating cameras, basic audio equipment, and other production equipment.
  • A/V Production II - Building on knowledge acquired in A/V Production I, this course advances technical skill in utilizing industry equipment related to lighting and audio, and it places special emphasis on the research and technical writing involved in planning productions.
  • A/V Production III - Students in this course will apply knowledge and skills from previous courses in the program of study to create productions both independently and in teams. Students will use industry equipment and technology to complete all phases of the production process, including planning, coordinating, capturing, editing, and distributing productions.

Information Technology Pathway:

  • Computer Science Foundations (NIC) - Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in the IT profession.
  • Coding I - A course intended to teach students the basics of computer programming. The course places emphasis on practicing standard programming techniques and learning the logic tools and methods typically used by programmers to create simple computer applications.
  • Coding II (NIC) - This course challenges students to develop advanced skills in problem analysis, construction of algorithms, and computer implementation of algorithms as they work on programming projects of increased complexity.
  • AP Computer Science - Learn to analyze data and create technology that has a practical impact, and gain a broader understanding of how computer science impacts people and society.

 

Health Science Elective Course Descriptions:

  • (1st required) Health Science Education - An introductory course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of biotechnology research, therapeutics, health informatics, diagnostics, and support services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in these fields, compare and contrast the features of healthcare systems, explain the legal and ethical ramifications of the healthcare setting, and begin to perform foundational healthcare skills.
  • (2nd option) Diagnostic Medicine (NIC) - A second or third level course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of radiology, medical laboratory, optometry, and other patient diagnostic procedures.
  • (2nd required) Anatomy and Physiology - An upper level course designed to develop an understanding of the structures and functions of the human body, while relating those to knowledge and skills associated with pathophysiology.
  • (2nd required) Medical Therapeutics (NIC) - An applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in therapeutic services. Students will be able to identify careers in therapeutics services; assess, monitor, evaluate, and report patient/client health status; and identify the purpose and components of treatments.
  • (2nd option) Rehabilitation Careers (NIC) - An applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in rehabilitation services. Students will be able to identify careers in rehabilitation services, recognize diseases, disorders or injuries related to rehabilitation services and correlate the related anatomy and physiology then develop a plan of treatment with appropriate modalities.
  • (3rd option) Emergency Medical Services (NIC) - Designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of emergency medicine. Students will be able to: identify careers and features of the EMS system; define the importance of workforce safety and wellness; maintain legal and ethical guidelines; correlate anatomy and physiology concepts to the patient with a medical or traumatic injury; and perform EMS skills with a high level of proficiency.
  • (3rd option) Pharmacological Sciences (NIC) - A third-level applied course intended to prepare students with an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the healthcare worker in a pharmacy setting. This course equips students with the communication, goal- setting, and information-processing skills to be successful in the workplace, in addition to covering key topics in pharmacology, pharmacy law and regulations, sterile and non-sterile compounding, medication safety, quality assurance, and more.
  • (3rd option) Exercise Science (NIC) - An applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in kinesiology and exercise physiology services. Students will be able to apply concepts of anatomy and physiology, physics, chemistry, bioenergetics, and kinesiology to specific exercise science contexts. Through these connections students will understand the importance that exercise, nutrition, and rehabilitation play in athletes or patients with debilitating or acute metabolic, orthopedic, neurological, psychological, and cardiovascular disorders.
  • (4th option) Nursing Education (NIC) - This course is designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the field of nursing. Students will be able to implement communication and interpersonal skills, maintain residents’ rights and independence, provide care safely, prevent emergency situations, prevent infection through infection control, and perform the skills required of a nursing assistant.
  • (4th option) Clinical Internship (4th option) - A work-based learning experience designed to provide students with real-world application of skills and knowledge obtained in a Prerequisite Health Science course. Prior to beginning work at a clinical site, students must be certified in Basic Life Support (BLS) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and deemed competent in basic first aid, body mechanics, Standard Precaution guidelines, and confidentiality.

 

Skilled Professions Elective Course Descriptions:

 

Construction Pathway:

  • Fundamental of Construction (NIC) - This course is a foundational course in the Construction cluster covering essential knowledge, skills, and concepts required for careers in construction. Students will be able to employ tools safely and interpret construction drawings to complete projects demonstrating proper measurement and application of mathematical concepts.
  • Electrical Systems (NIC) - This course prepares students for careers as electricians across a variety of residential and commercial environments. Students will be able to implement safety procedures and tools to perform operations with device boxes, conduit, raceway systems conductors, and cable. Students will read and interpret the National Electrical Code, drawings, specifications, and diagrams to determine materials and procedures needed to complete a project.
  • HVAC Systems (NIC) -This course prepares students for careers in residential and commercial heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and skill in performing basic operations with HVAC systems, with emphasis on safety, tools, and equipment specific to HVAC. In addition, students will be able to explain the functions and components of heating, cooling, and air distribution systems.

Cosmetology Pathway:

  • Cosmetology I - Content provides students the opportunity to acquire basic fundamental skills in both theory and practical applications of leadership and interpersonal skill development. Content stresses safety, environmental issues, and protection of the public and designers as integrated with principles of hair design, nail structure, and cosmetic procedures.
  • Cosmetology II - The second level of cosmetology which prepares students for work-related skills and advancement into the Chemistry of Cosmetology course. Advanced knowledge and skills in hair design, nail artistry, and cosmetic applications will be enhanced in a laboratory setting.
  • Cosmetology III - An advanced level of cosmetology, it prepares students to perform work-related services using chemicals in the cosmetology industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire foundation skills in both theory and practical applications.

Engineering Pathway:

  • Principles of Engineering and Technology (NIC) - A foundational course in the STEM cluster for students interested in learning more about careers in engineering and technology. Students are able to identify and explain the steps in the engineering design process. They can evaluate an existing engineering design, use fundamental sketching and engineering drawing techniques, complete simple design projects using the engineering design process, and effectively communicate design solutions to others.
  • Engineering Design I - A fundamental course in the STEM cluster for students interested in developing their skills in preparation for careers in engineering and technology. The course covers essential knowledge, skills, and concepts required for postsecondary engineering and technology fields of study.
  • Engineering Design II (NIC) - This course covers knowledge, skills, and concepts required for postsecondary engineering and technology fields of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to explain the differences between scientists and engineers, understand the importance of ethical practices in engineering and technology, identify components of control systems, describe differences between laws related to fluid power systems, explain why material and mechanical properties are important to design, create simple free body diagrams, use measurement devices employed in engineering, conduct basic engineering economic analysis, follow the steps in the engineering design process to complete a team project, and effectively communicate design solutions to others.



Work Based Learning - an opportunity to work in the community in a setting that aligns with your CTE pathway - available for all CTE pathways as the 4th class in the series - requires a teacher recommendation, application, and approval by CTE teacher, SLC counselor and SLC principal